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Roof Rot: Ignorance Is an Easy Way to Damage Low-slope Residential Roofs

Change often brings with it unintended consequences, and the issue of reflective roof surfaces in North America is no exception. In the late 1990s, U.S. cities in northern climates started to mandate the use of reflective roof—more for politics, feel-good, pseudo-environmental reasons than sustainable, resilient and durable reasons. In my estimation, cool roofs often did more to lower the quality of buildings than enhance them. Furthermore, code and standard changes were made with no understanding of the result and no education to the architects of America.

Figure 1: Reduced attic space resulted in a roof section comprised of the following components from the interior to the roof cover.

Figure 1: Reduced attic space resulted in a roof section comprised of the following components from the interior to the roof cover.

Although the resulting unintended consequences affected commercial and residential buildings, it was the often-catastrophic results on low-slope residential buildings that went untold and left homeowners with tens of thousands of dollars of corrective work on basically new residences.

Following is a summary of how these concerns evolved in wood-framed residential construction. I’ve included case studies of failures, potential solutions and lessons learned.

HISTORY

During the industrialization of America’s large cities throughout the 1800s, the need for labor caused populations to explode. To house the labor migration, row houses (3- to 4-story structures, often with a garden level and four or more narrow units) were constructed approximately 3-feet apart, block after block, creating medium-sized apartment blocks. Most of these row houses were wood-framed, masonry veneer with low-slope roof structures. The interior walls and ceilings were finished in cementitious plaster, which provided a durable, fire-resistive finish. The plaster also performed as an effective air and vapor barrier, preventing interior conditioned air from penetrating into the non-insulated walls and ceilings where it could condense within the walls and roof on cold days.

Photo 1: A contractor was called out to fix the “soft roof” and found this catastrophic situation.

Photo 1: A contractor was called out to fix the “soft roof” and found this catastrophic situation.

Heating costs were low, so little—if any—insulation was installed in the walls and roof. Roofs were composed of built-up asphalt and coal tar, both smooth and aggregate surfaced. Attic spaces often 4 to 6 feet in height were vented via static vents. Any conditioned air that passed to the attic was able to dissipate through these static vents. This method of construction performed without significant attic condensation, and the roof systems and roof structure served these buildings for decades.

In the mid 1990s, researchers (theoretical researchers with no architectural, engineering, roofing, construction or practical building technology experience or knowledge) at research institutes conducted studies into the effects of minimizing solar gain through the roof via a reflective surface. Based on the researchers’ algorithmic findings and recommendations (regardless of their validity), environmental groups used the concept to promote change. Large cities started introducing new energy codes with reflective roofing requirements and prescribed reflectance values. These new codes contained greater insulation requirements, which was a benefit. However, in this one code adoption, roof systems, such as coal-tar pitch, that had performed for centuries were no longer permitted. Consequently, roofing contractors went out of business and so did some roofing material manufacturers because of unproven and suspect research.

Photos and Details: Hutchinson Design Group Ltd.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Roof Rot: Ignorance Is an Easy Way to Damage Low-slope Residential Roofs

RCMA Selects New Executive Director

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) has selected Matt Coffindaffer as its new Executive Director. Matt replaces Jim Kirby, who leaves RCMA to pursue his professional interests in architecture and building science.

“RCMA has a management team supporting its members each and every day to bring a unified voice on issues important to the roof coatings industry,” says Kirby. “It has been an honor serving as Executive Director for RCMA, and I am happy to pass the torch to Matt.”

Coffindaffer is a Certified Association Executive and has several years of experience working in Washington, D.C. in association management. Matt has served as Executive Director of the OpenTravel Alliance and led strategic initiatives for a number of associations including the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), the National Pest Management Association, and the National Council of Agricultural Employers. He is a 2016 recipient of the Association Forum USAE 40 under 40 and an ASAE NextGen alumni.

“I am looking forward to the opportunity to serve the members of RCMA, our constituencies, and our industry,” says Coffindaffer. “I believe in the power of collaboration and in bringing people of all backgrounds and varying levels of experience and expertise to drive consensus, create new opportunities and value, and otherwise further the mission and vision of RCMA and our industry.”

Coffindaffer completed both his undergraduate degree and M.B.A. from West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV. In his free time, he likes to participate in triathlons and play recreational league soccer.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>RCMA Selects New Executive Director

Self-Adhering Modified Bitumen Membrane Offers High Reflectivity, Ease of Installation

Polyfresko G SAPolyfresko G SA is a highly reflective, granular surfaced APP modified bitumen roofing membrane meant for self-adhering applications. The product is manufactured by Polyglass using the company’s patented ADESO dual-compound self-adhesive technology. Polyfresko G SA features patented FASTLap for granule-free roll ends, as well as SEALLap, a factory-applied adhesive treatment at the membrane overlap for easy installation. Polyfresko G SA has a highly reflective granular surface and features patent-pending CURE Technology-a thin film that is applied during the manufacturing process resulting in a roof surface resistant to granule loss and discoloration. Bright white, Polyfresko G SA membrane has shown after accelerated weathering that it maintains its reflectivity and white appearance. The membrane is also constructed with a high-performance polyester reinforcement providing exceptional tensile strength and dimensional stability.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Self-Adhering Modified Bitumen Membrane Offers High Reflectivity, Ease of Installation

University of Florida Wins Student Construction Management Competition

For the second consecutive year, a team from University of Florida, Gainesville, was selected as the winner of The Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress’ third student construction management competition, which took place during the National Roofing Contractors Association’s (NRCA’s) 130th Annual Convention held in Las Vegas.

Members of the winning team were Will Foster, Caleb Strauss (team captain), Schaffer Weeks, Forest Wilson and faculty advisor Jim Sullivan.

Six schools of construction management participated in this year’s competition: McWhorter School of Building Sciences at Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.; Department of Construction Management at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo.; Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La.; Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Ala.; the University of Cincinnati; and M.E. Ringer Sr. School of Building Construction at the University of Florida.

The goal of the outreach to the construction management schools is to raise awareness of the roofing industry by developing roofing-related curriculum that can be incorporated into existing construction management undergraduate degree programs, exploring scholarship programs for both students and faculty members and developing an internship program with interested Alliance members.

Teams participating in the competition were presented with a problem statement: Create a company to bid on installing a roof system on the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. Each team was required to research the project, review the plans and specifications, and assemble a full estimate and proposal to submit a qualified bid package. All teams had to find a competitive edge in their estimate to beat their competition while still maintaining a reasonable margin. For this project, it was important to decide on the correct application methods, show overall roofing knowledge and illustrate a company team is prepared to undertake the project.

Each team submitted written proposals and supporting documents in December 2016, and gave oral presentations at the convention.

Orange County Construction, the University of Florida’s team company had the highest cumulative score. The team had a thorough understanding of the project; a safety plan which included planning, training and execution and a well-prepared presentation. In addition, they were well-prepared to answer judges’ questions.

The University of Florida received a team trophy, a $5,000 L.B. Conway scholarship for their school and individual prizes that were presented during NRCA’s Industry Awards Ceremony and Cocktail Reception.

Plans are now underway for the 2017-18 Alliance student competition at NRCA’s 131st annual convention in New Orleans Feb. 6-8, 2018.

For more information about the Alliance student competition, contact Bennett Judson, the Alliance’s executive director, at (800) 323-9545, ext. 7513 or bjudson@roofingindustryalliance.net.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>University of Florida Wins Student Construction Management Competition

Shingle Starter Material Is Non-porous

SBS Shingle Starter is a SBS modified starter strip coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules.

SBS Shingle Starter is a SBS modified starter strip coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules.

MB Technology’s SBS Shingle Starter is a premium SBS modified starter strip completely coated on both sides with SBS rubberized asphalt compound and surfaced with black ceramic granules. The SBS rubberized membrane provides a flexible starter roll and, because it’s non-porous, it provides a watertight membrane by itself. The fiberglass-reinforced product is used for eave and rake starter material for composition roofing. It is used with minimum 3/8-inch head roofing nails, fastened 12 inches on center and at 4 to 6 inches above the edge of the roof or as required by the shingle manufacturer.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Shingle Starter Material Is Non-porous

Offices & Warehouses

Workforce Essentials, Clarksville, Tenn.

Team

Roofing and Wall Panel Installer: Modern Heating Cooling Roofing, Clarksville, (931) 647-0815
Architect: Lyle Cook Martin Architects, Clarksville
Metal Panel Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties Inc., Nashville, Tenn.

Roof Materials

To meet design objectives, four different PAC-CLAD products were selected. The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels. The façade features 7,800 square feet of Precision Series wall panels finished in Sierra Tan and installed vertically. Complementing the façade is 4,000 square feet of 12-inch Almond Flush panels installed as soffit. In addition, 4,520 square feet of 24-gauge Medium Bronze flat sheet was used for fascia and trim.

“The Tite-Loc Plus panels were long—85 feet—and were rollformed onsite,” says Bill Kimbrough Jr., estimator and project manager for Modern Heating Cooling Roofing. “Getting them up to the high roof was a challenge. All other profiles were fabricated and delivered by Petersen. Currently, PAC-CLAD is about the only product we use.”

Metal Panel Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Roof Report

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area in the middle of the state. Located on a highly visible urban-infill site, the new Workforce Essentials headquarters and career training center is situated at a “gateway entry” intersection to the downtown district. The new 40,000-squarefoot facility consolidates services that had been provided at agency offices previously scattered around the city. After initially considering renovation of an aging building on the site, the organization’s board of directors determined that construction of a new, energy-efficient headquarters was a better course of action. Good visibility and an easily identifiable aesthetic were important to site selection and building design criteria.

Different departments within the building are visually and strategically defined in separate wings and entrances. The administrative office wing to the south is defined by a vertical brick corner tower and sloping metal roof planes and cladding. The larger career training center portion of the building is introduced by metal wall panels in a calming color palette of Sierra Tan. Thematic entry canopies, protruding aluminum sunshades and aligned horizontal fenestration tie together the architectural composition. The overriding idea is for the building to serve as a machine with different parts working together for a common purpose.

Brad Martin, principal/designer at Lyle Cook Martin Architects, explains: “Workforce Essentials has a variety of regional offices throughout the area it serves. All are different and very few are freestanding. The organization has never really had a corporate look or identity. Now, with this new building, we can incorporate its design features and architectural aesthetics into future new buildings and renovations and begin to develop an iconic look.”

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Offices & Warehouses

Coating System Makes Roofing and Cladding Appear Aged, Weathered

Bossier City, La.-based McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw is new to the company’s product line, offering the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles. The look of aged or weathered roofing and wall cladding is growing in popularity and used in commercial, residential and industrial applications. Cor-Ten AZP Raw provides the appearance of rusted metal with the advantages of a highly reflective PVDF coating.

“We’re offering the appearance of weathered steel without having to wait for time and Mother Nature,” says Ken Gieseke, vice president of Marketing at McElroy Metal. “As soon as it’s installed, the weathered aesthetic is evident, attractive and durable. It’s sure to become a popular choice of architects and building owners seeking the look of weathered steel.”

In 2005, U.S. Steel introduced Cor-Ten AZP prepainted steel sheet to provide architects, building owners and homeowners with an enhanced performance product to its Cor-Ten steel. McElroy Metal offers the moderately weathered Cor-Ten AZP Raw, a carefully crafted and engineered system to provide any roofing or cladding project with the authentic look of timelessness.

Raw is produced by McElroy Metal in collaboration with Valspar and U.S. Steel.

To learn more, visit here or call (318) 747-8000.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Coating System Makes Roofing and Cladding Appear Aged, Weathered

Insulation Alternative Receives Patent

Rich-E-Board provides an insulation alternative for the commercial roofing market.

Rich-E-Board provides an insulation alternative for the commercial roofing market.

Rich-E-Board is an insulated composite panel system created by R-50 Systems to provide an insulation alternative for the commercial roofing market. While conventional insulation requires a thickness of 15 inches to reach an R-value of 50, Rich-E-Board achieves the same result at just 1 1/2-inches thick. Rich-E-Board can be installed on most roof deck types and can support all conventional low-slope roof systems. The product recently received a patent for its proprietary Vacuum Insulated Panel—two polymeric foam cover boards that sandwich the panel—and the adhesive ribbons that bind the boards and panel together. Rich-E-Board is cut-to-spec and lightweight, as well as mold and fire resistant.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Insulation Alternative Receives Patent

Dallas Roofing Contractor Partners with Habitat for Humanity to Repair and Replace Roofs for Deserving Homeowners

Chris Zazo, CEO of Aspenmark Roofing & Solar, Dallas, established the non-profit Roof Angels, which repairs and/or replaces up to 30 roofs per year through Habitat for Humanity’s A Brush with Kindness program.

Chris Zazo, CEO of Aspenmark Roofing & Solar, Dallas, established the non-profit Roof Angels, which repairs and/or replaces up to 30 roofs per year through Habitat for Humanity’s A Brush with Kindness program.

Chris Zazo is a CEO who sees opportunity everywhere. When he needed a corporate gift idea to give to hail-restoration customers of his commercial roofing business, Dallas-based Aspenmark Roofing & Solar, he established Hailstone Vineyards in Napa Valley, Calif., and now makes his own cabernet sauvignon and chardonnay.

While considering how to differentiate Aspenmark Roofing & Solar from its competitors in a market that has no licensing, Zazo embraced community service. “I wanted to find a way to better our industry and really take the sting off the title of ‘roofing contractor,’” he says. “We were getting asked every year by this charity and that organization to support their causes‚ which we were happy to do. Then we got involved doing the new-build roofs for Dallas Habitat for Humanity and really rallied around that organization.”

To differentiate his firm’s charitable work from its for-profit work, Zazo officially established the non-profit Roof Angels in 2013, but he couldn’t quiet his entrepreneurial spirit. He wondered how he could involve the entire roofing industry in community service. “I really wanted to put together a program for the industry,” he explains. “I wanted to get the manufacturers and distributors involved, get our employees involved and create a model in which if we took it to a national organization it could be replicated anywhere in the United States. I dug a little further and found out Habitat has a program called A Brush with Kindness, which is perfect for this idea.”

Although the homes chosen for restoration are usually small, Zazo says they often have extensive damage and four or five layers of shingles.

Although the homes chosen for restoration are usually small, Zazo says they often have extensive damage and four or five layers of shingles.

A Brush with Kindness is Habitat for Humanity’s home-repair program for owners who are struggling to maintain their homes. The program seeks $10,000 donations to support one family’s home repairs. “When we found out about this program, we jumped in and asked, ‘What if we [Aspenmark Roofing & Solar] took the roof off of your hands?’” Zazo recalls. “The roof is usually about 50 to 70 percent of the budget for the home repairs, so, without it in the budget, A Brush with Kindness could do much more to a deserving family’s home. I reached out to GAF to see if they’d donate the shingles. I called SRS Distribution to see if they’d donate the accessory items and delivery. Then all we had to do was raise money for the labor. We proposed this model to Habitat and they said, ‘We love it. When can you start?’”

FUNDRAISING

A Brush with Kindness’ representatives asked Roof Angels and its partners, Parsippany, N.J.-based GAF and McKinney, Texas-based SRS Distribution, to repair and/or replace up to 30 roofs per year. In the beginning, Zazo hadn’t thought through the fundraising part of Roof Angels, so he was often paying his crews for these roof installations out of his own pocket. He started holding Happy Hours and other small events in which he could quickly raise a few thousand dollars.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Dallas Roofing Contractor Partners with Habitat for Humanity to Repair and Replace Roofs for Deserving Homeowners

NRCA Supports Trump’s Focus on Reducing Regulatory Burdens

Dennis Conway, chairman of NRCA’s board of directors, has issued the following statement:

“NRCA welcomes the administration’s focus on reducing regulatory burdens on entrepreneurs, our nation’s job creators. The roofing industry has endured a wide array of regulations issued by federal agencies in recent years, and NRCA members consistently indicate regulatory reform is one of their top priorities.

“The Executive Order issued on Jan. 30 requires each federal agency to identify two existing regulations that will be cut for every new rule proposed. For the remainder of fiscal year 2017, any additional regulations issued by the federal government must be completely offset by repealing existing rules. For fiscal year 2018 and beyond, the Executive Order establishes a reformed regulatory process for newly proposed regulations. It also contains exceptions for regulations related to the military, national security or foreign affairs and those related to agency organization, management or personnel.

“The Executive Order appears to be consistent with NRCA’s longstanding support for regulatory reform that ensures regulations achieve public policy goals without imposing unreasonable burdens on businesses. We look forward to reviewing more details regarding how this Executive Order will be implemented, and we encourage the administration to work closely with Congress to develop sound regulatory policies in a manner consistent with American law and values.”

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>NRCA Supports Trump’s Focus on Reducing Regulatory Burdens

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