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RCI Technical Advisory Committee Offers Position Statement on Cool Roofs

The RCI Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) has released a position statement, which has been published on the RCI website. RCI has previously released position statements for a variety of issues, but this is the first one written by the TAC.

TAC Chair Doug Stieve led the development of this position statement. As leader, he recruited officemate Kenrick Hartman to provide assistance. Hartman is a member of the RCI Emerging Professionals Committee, which approached the TAC a number of months ago, asking if it could use the assistance of EP Committee members. The TAC gladly accepted the experiment. The purpose of the resulting joint program is to provide young RCI members with a means of gaining professional involvement and experience by contributing to a real-world task that benefits RCI members. According to RCI, Stieve and Hartman’s teamwork was successful and such collaboration between the TAC and the EP Committee is planned to continue as the TAC produces future Technical Advisories or Position Statements.

Links to Position Statements and Technical Advisories can be found here.

For more information, visit http://rci-online.org.

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New RhinoBond roof keeps popular brewery hopping

System chosen due to ease of installation, energy savings, and advanced technology to bond the membrane without penetration.

Standing in line for hours for one case of canned beer might seem foolish to some people, but to fans of Tree House Brewing – which was recently named one of the country’s Top 15 Craft Breweries by Forbes magazine – it is well worth it. Tree House Brewing began humbly enough in 2011 in a barn in Brimfield, Massachusetts. And yes, there was a tree house on the property.

Since then, the brewery has grown so much in popularity that it required a bigger facility. So in July of 2017, Tree House opened a 51,200-squarefoot brewery on 68 acres in Charlton, Massachusetts. On opening day, the new facility consistently had 1,000 customers waiting for hours to purchase Tree House’s ales, IPAs and stouts. Many of the patrons traveled from out of state and some arrived at 6 a.m., six hours before the doors opened.

It’s been said that the key to Tree House Brewing’s success is meticulous attention to details such as temperatures, additives and the water used in the brewing. It only made sense that the same attention to detail would be utilized when selecting a roofing system for the new facility.

Meeting the Bar

The roof that Tree House Brewing selected to cover its new brewery is the Sarnafil EnergySmart membrane in White installed with the Sarnafil RhinoBond System. “We like Sarnafil because it is easy to use, easy to specify and an industry leader,” said Peter Webster, designer/project manager at Austin Design in Brattleboro, Vermont. “The light colored, reflective roof also offers energy savings, and our past experience with the Sarnafil roof shows it is a great product.”

The fact that the Sarnafil system is easy to install was an important factor, considering the time crunch of the project. “This was a ‘hurry up’ project – we weren’t done with the design when the steel structure went up,” Webster explained.

The Sarnafil RhinoBond System uses advanced induction welding technology to bond the membrane directly to specially coated plates used to secure the insulation to the deck, all without penetrating the roofing membrane.

In addition, the Sarnafil RhinoBond System can be used in temperatures as low as 0°F (-18°C), making it an ideal application method for winter projects.

“Much of the installation was during the winter,” stated Robert Luukko, president of Kidd-Luukko Corporation in Worcester, Massachusetts, the roofing contractor on the project.

“Not only did Kidd-Luukko have to deal with cold temperatures, but the site is on top of a hill so there were high winds,” remarked Frank Quigley, president and owner of F.D. Quigley & Associates of Wilbraham, Massachusetts, the construction manager on the job. And of course, since it was winter they needed to make the building watertight as quickly as possible.

“Fortunately, Kidd-Luukko was able to seal the building before we were hit by some big snowstorms in February,” Webster said.

Other challenges included installing a 42-foot by 8-foot skylight and working around gables where the low roof wrapped around the corners. “Kidd-Luukko employees were very professional, well managed and well organized,” Quigley stated. “I’d be happy to use them again.”

Can Do Attitude

“Bob Luukko and his team had a ‘can do’ attitude that really helped move the project along,” Webster commented. In fact, Kidd-Luukko was able to complete the installation ahead of the allotted eight-month time frame, Luukko said, adding that teamwork was key. “We had weekly meetings with a great group of guys involved with the project where we would discuss how we were going to come in on time and on budget with this installation,” he said. Sika Roofing representatives also played a role in meeting the deadline. “We had multiple visits from the Sika technician, which really kept the project moving forward,” Luukko remarked.

Moving Ahead

Today, both the roof and the brewery are doing great. “We’ve had no problems with the roof at all,” Webster said. Luukko added, “This project went so well that we are receiving a lot of interest in installing Sarnafil roofs on other projects.” The brewery also continues to thrive. At the new facility, Tree House Brewing will be able to produce 40,000 barrels a year – compared to 12,000 barrels at their former facility in Monson, Massachusetts – and they plan to eventually expand the capacity to 180,000 barrels a year. News that should make thirsty Tree House beer fans very, very happy.

Learn more about OMG Roofing Products.

Editor’s note: This article was first published on OMG’s blog and can be viewed here.

 

 

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Coordination Is the Key to Re-Roofing Active Port Terminal

Owned by the Port of New Orleans, the Nashville Ave. Terminal Complex offers more than a million square feet of cargo space. When the structure’s original built-up roof reached the end of its service life, a standing seam metal roof was manufactured and installed by Ray Bros. Inc. on the vast majority of the building. Photo: Aero Photo.

Construction projects on active jobsites can mean coordinating a lot of moving parts. Projects don’t get much more complicated than the recent roof replacement at the Nashville Ave. Terminal Complex, owned by the Port of New Orleans. The scope of work was multifaceted, the schedule was daunting, and everyone entering the facility had to have the proper security credentials. All of the work was performed next to the Mississippi River on top of an active wharf building, with cargo coming in and going out on trucks and forklifts as ships were loaded and unloaded. Materials housed inside the building were sensitive to moisture, dust and debris — and often had to be moved as work progressed.

Gino Ray Sr., president of Ray Bros. Inc., the roofing contractor on the project, likened it to a giant, three-dimensional puzzle. “It was almost like a Rubik’s Cube,” he says. “They had to move a section of material, and then when we finished a section, they slid the material over there so we could move on the next one. The whole time, the port was in operation. There was a lot of dancing involved.”

The Terminal

The Nashville Ave. Terminal Complex, operated by Ports America Louisiana Inc., offers more than 1 million square feet of storage space. Built in the 1960s, the structure was a rigid-frame, iron building with a ballasted tar and gravel roof over a heavy tongue-and-groove wooden deck. Decades of problems had seriously deteriorated the wooden deck, as well as the four-by-four wood nailers that were bolted to the rafters and purlins.

Key members of the team on the project included (from Left) N. Guy Williams of ECM Consultants, Kevin Haslauer of Glendale Enterprises, Gino Ray Sr. of Ray Bros. Inc., Craig Clark of Gulf Coast Service Group, and Curtis Shinogle of Gulf Coast Service Group.

The structure’s failing roof was replaced in three phases. During Phase 1, undertaken about a decade ago, a new built-up roof system was installed on one end of the building. When that section experienced performance issues, the owners looked for other options. Ray Bros. had the answer: an architectural metal roof.

Ray Bros. has been in business in New Orleans since 1996, when it was founded by Gino Ray Sr. The company has always focused primarily on metal roofing, and in the late ’90s it began roll forming and manufacturing its own panels and systems. “Today we manufacture everything we install,” Ray notes. “We’re kind of a hybrid — a manufacturer/contractor.”

The company’s metal panel system had been installed on several other port buildings, and the owners specified it for Phase 2 of the project, which covered a 230,000-square-foot section near the center of the building on either side of the firewall. Phase 2 was completed in 2014. Phase 3 encompassed 420,000 square feet to complete the sections on either side of Phase 2. Work began in August of 2016 and completed in May of 2017.

Ray Bros. manufactured and installed all of the metal roofing on the building — a total of 650,000 square feet — and served as both the prime contractor and the roofing contractor on the third phase of the project. Ray credits his dedicated team, the cooperation of all of the companies involved, and an innovative strategy for coping with the project’s many hurdles as the keys to a successful outcome.

Beefing Up the Structure

The standing seam metal roof system recommended by Ray Bros. was specified for its durability and low maintenance. The new system would give the port the long lifespan the owners desired, but it would necessitate some structural changes.

“Before we put the metal roof on, we had to beef up the existing trusses and reinforce the existing structure because it was such a light building now,” Ray notes. “There was an enormous amount of welding to the exiting trusses and existing purlins that had to be done before we could begin to put the roof on.”

Metal panels were roll formed directly onto the roof for installation. The panels on one side of the roof were 180 feet long. Photo: Ray Bros. Inc.

The plan was to beef up the structure from the inside and install the new gutters. Then the old roof could then be torn off and the new metal roof installed. The roof installation would be completed in sections, with crews moving from one area to the next in sequence.

Gulf Coast Service Group served as the structural steel and demolition contractor. Crews on man lifts set up inside the building reinforced the existing steel structure. New angle irons were welded to the bottom of the purlins. The existing sprinkler system had to be reconfigured, as it was attached to the four-by-four wood nailers that had to be removed. Work on the sprinklers was performed in conjunction with S & S Sprinkler Company. “We didn’t have to dismantle the sprinkler system, just move it,” Ray explains. “New hangers were mounted to the steel. We had to put a hanger on, take a hanger off. That was part of the tango dance as well.”

After the welders completed their work, crews from RK Hydrovac vacuumed the ballast off the roof. Prior to the demolition work, approximately 4,100 linear feet of gutters were installed. Oversized gutters were manufactured from 16-gauge stainless steel in the Ray Bros. metal shop, and all of the joints were welded together. Gutter sections were raised into place with a lift and secured with stainless steel brackets and hangers. “That gutter weighed about 11 pounds per running foot, and we made it in 21-foot lengths,” Ray notes.

The Roof Installation

The demolition crews and installation crews then swung into action. After sections of the deck were removed, metal panels were roll-formed on the site and installed. “The demo people would tear out a bay — which is a 20-foot section — all the way up to the ridge,” Ray explains. “On one side of the roof, the panels were 180 feet long. So, they would tear out a 20-foot-by-180-foot section, and we would come in right after that and put a 20-foot section of 180-foot panels down.”

Crew members on lifts reinforced the existing steel structure before the new roof was installed. Photo: Ray Bros. Inc.

Panels were made from 22-gauge galvalume. Zimmerman Metals supplied roll forming machines to Ray Bros. Inc. so the company could manufacture its proprietary product. The RBI MT-240 panels were 18 inches wide and interlock using continuous clips. A batten cap was installed over the top and then mechanically seamed using a machine manufactured by D.I. Roof Seamers.

The roll-up bay doors along the sides of the building and at the gable ends of the warehouse qualified it as a partially enclosed structure, which necessitated strict engineering standards. “In order to meet engineering standards, we had to use continuous clips,” Ray notes.

Every third bay had a skylight system to light the interior. Skylights used on the project were manufactured by CPI Daylighting Systems and installed by Glendale Industries. Custom-made curbs and crickets were fashioned by Ray Bros.

When skylights could not be installed right away, the openings were covered with plywood and felt to eliminate safety hazards and keep the interior of the building dry. “When the Glendale Industries people would show up, we’d remove the plywood and they would put on their system,” Ray notes. “As the job progressed, we’d re-use the same plywood and temporary coverings as we went along. We’d just leapfrog the plywood from curb to curb.”

After the roof was completed, the last step was to replace the wall panels in the interior that were designed to trap the smoke in the event of a fire. The old corrugated smoke panels were wired to the steel, but that system would not comply with today’s standards, so Ray Bros. created a sub-framing system to attach new ones. “We had 500 squares of smoke panels to install beneath the roof system,” Ray states. “We put in some16-gauge furring channels and attached the panels with screws. We manufactured all of that in house.”

After the roof was installed, 50,000 square feet of new corrugated smoke panels were installed. Photo: Ray Bros. Inc.

The demo crews, installation crews, and skylight crews kept moving in sequence under the direction of Jobsite Superintendent Robert Sinopoli, a 30-year industry veteran who has been with Ray Bros. ever since the company was founded. Sinopoli monitored everyone’s progress on the site and made sure everyone knew their assignments each day. “Everybody leapfrogged everybody else,” Ray notes. “Everyone had their own song and dance, and if one person got out of rhythm, it would domino back.”

Everyone involved on the project also needed to have a dance card, as security on the site was tight. Workers needed to have a background check and Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC). Every vehicle had to have proper registration, insurance and inspection tags. The jobsite did not allow personal vehicles, and this posed a problem for Ray Bros., as the company routinely had 40 to 50 workers on site. “Everybody had to be on a company vehicle in a seat with a seat belt,” Ray notes. “I had to buy a used bus to transport workers in and out. We painted it, put our logo on it and made it look pretty. We just drove it 1.5 miles a day. At the end of the job, I sold the bus.”

Big Chunks

The project was wrapped up ahead of schedule, and it was the sequencing of work that was the key its success, according to Ray. “We didn’t want to tackle this project one bay at a time; we were looking at big chunks at a time,” he says. “We were able to develop a rhythm quicker that way. Instead of changing hats several times in the course of a day or a week, we put a hat on, let it stay on, got a big section done and moved on to the next. We didn’t want to change tools and change personnel. We wanted to look at it like a monolithic application.”

In the end, it all boiled down to pride — no one wanted to be the one to falter. “We self-perform a lot of our work, and we have existing relationships with all of the subcontractors we use,” Ray says. “I’m never going to let them down or leave them hanging, and I know they are going to do the same for me. That’s what made that job go — no one wanted to be the weak link. Everybody had a job to do and they did it. It worked out great.”

It was a true team effort. “This was like our Super Bowl, and we won,” Ray concludes. “I’m real proud of my company, our people, and all the people we worked with. I know that on our next job, I can count on them and they know they can count on me.”

TEAM

Architect: ECM Consultants, Metairie, Louisiana, www.ecmconsultants.com
General Contractor and Roofing Contractor: Ray Bros. Inc., New Orleans, Louisiana, www.raybrosinc.com
Structural Steel and Demolition Contractor: Gulf Coast Service Group, Harvey, Louisiana
Skylight Installer: Glendale Enterprises, Norco, Louisiana, www.glendaleinc.com
Sprinkler Repair Contractor: S & S Sprinkler Company, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, www.sssprinkler.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: 18-inch wide, 22-gauge galvalume MT-240 standing seam panels, Ray Bros. Inc.
Skylights: CPI Daylighting Systems, www.cpidaylighting.com
Roll Former: Zimmerman Metals Inc., www.zimmerman-metals.com

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Coordination Is the Key to Re-Roofing Active Port Terminal

NRCA commends U.S. Senate Committee approval of strengthening career and technical education for the 21st Century Act

Legislation will expand learning opportunities, encourage development of industry wide credentials, and provide employer and educator engagement.

NRCA commends the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions’ approval of the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act. The legislation is designed to reform and reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (CTE) Act of 2006.

NRCA believes the legislation, approved June 26 will provide expanded opportunities for work-based learning and incentives to encourage the development of industry recognized credentials. The legislation also will provide for more effective engagement between roofing industry employers and educators in the development of CTE programs in the future.

Workforce development is one of the most difficult challenges facing NRCA members. Reforming CTE programs that operate under the Perkins Act is critical to helping our members address their future workforce needs.

We also are pleased to see policy recommendations from NRCA and other associations have largely been incorporated into the legislation.

NRCA is one of the construction industry’s most respected trade associations and the voice of roofing professionals and leading authority in the roofing industry for information, education, technology and advocacy. It represents all segments of the roofing industry, including contractors; manufacturers; distributors; architects; consultants; engineers; building owners; and city, state and government agencies. NRCA’s mission is to inform and assist the roofing industry, act as its principal advocate and help members in serving their customers. NRCA continually strives to enhance every aspect of the roofing industry. For information about NRCA and its services and offerings, visit www.nrca.net.

 

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Psychology-Based Strategies Can Help You Close More Deals

Getting potential customers to choose your roofing company rather than the competition comes down to more than just a name or reputation. Because consumer buying decisions are based in human psychology and emotion, you need to know how the brain interprets information so you can adjust your sales strategy accordingly.

To help close your next big roofing job, try incorporating some of the following psychology-based strategies into your advertising and sales pitch.

Use the Framing Effect

Consumers hate to miss out on opportunities.

For example, consider these two statements:

  1. Book an appointment online and receive a discount!
  2. Book an appointment online before August 1 and receive 10 percent off a new roof installation!

Both offer essentially the same proposition — book online to save some money. Put the first one on your website and you would get a few responses. Use the second appeal, however, and you could expect a considerably higher conversion rate.

Adding a deadline triggers a psychological technique known as the framing effect in your customers’ minds.

According to the framing effect, people react differently based on how options are presented. The thought of being left out — a condition known as loss aversion, or FOMO (fear of missing out) — causes a stronger, more immediate response than a simple discount or reward does.

Marketingland.com used college students to document how the framing effect works. Researchers sent emails reminding Ph.D. students to register for an economics conference. Some emails offered a discount for registering early, others mentioned a penalty for registering late. The penalty email had a much bigger impact, spurring 93 percent of the recipients to sign up early. By contrast, only 67 percent registered early when presented with the discount option.

Understanding the framing effect helps you position your value more effectively to customers. Combine that knowledge with some local market research and you have a good chance of outmaneuvering your competitors.

You Get What You Pay For

In addition to urgency and gain, consumers generally feel better when paying more for things that have tangible value versus paying less on a purchase with suspect quality or little value. To most consumers, price is a reflection of the quality of your work. Furthermore, your willingness to price match is a reflection of how much value they should place in you.

Consider the psychology of “we match all competitive quotes,” “lowest prices in town” or “free roof inspections.” You have set an expectation that your time has no value and your brand is built around a willingness to be cheap. When you take the time to defend your price with a well-developed sales pitch and refuse to compromise on quality, your customer will view your bid as a benchmark for all the rest.

Just keep in mind that you won’t win them all — because there will always be a segment of the market looking for the lowest cost and a company willing to offer it.

Avoid Analysis Paralysis

Always give customers fewer options. This strategy may sound counterintuitive, but if you give consumers too many alternatives, they are likely to avoid choosing any — a result known as “analysis paralysis.”

Instead of overwhelming buyers with every shingle type and color, group your products into a handful of categories from which they can choose, or perform a needs analysis to condition the sale before presenting product options.

Provide Social Proof

People like to fit in with the crowd and follow their peers. If one person approves of your services and products, his/her friends and family are likely to approve too. It’s a technique called social proof.

You can use digital media platforms to provide social proof and showcase how your current customers are benefitting from your roofing expertise.

For instance, always ask recent customers to write reviews on Facebook, Google and the Better Business Bureau (BBB). And don’t forget Yelp and other review sites. You can also encourage your customers to share your social content on their own Facebook pages, which they are more likely to do if you post transformative before-and-after photos and/or videos of their home.

Apply the Theory of Reciprocity

Giving people something helps create a bond between them and your company — even if it’s something as simple as a “like” on Facebook, a helpful video you share or an EagleView Report showing aerial images of their home.

Creating a feeling of loyalty can inspire customers to remember you when they are ready to tackle their next big project.

Let Your Body Talk

When meeting with prospects in person, use nonverbal cues in your body language to help make a good first impression and establish trust.

For instance:

  • Open your arms. Crossing your arms signals a closed-off or defensive attitude. Keeping your arms open and relaxed shows that you’re fully involved and interested in the discussion.
  • Lean forward. Leaning forward and in toward customers illustrates that you’re engaged in the conversation and paying attention.
  • Mirror. Try to match and mirror the body language of prospective buyers. Reflecting back the same posture, gestures and movements as your customers helps them to relax and feel comfortable during the sales pitch.

Tap Into The Reptilian Brain

Consumers continuously evaluate whether products and services are worth the cost. This decision-making process takes place in the reptilian brain — the oldest evolutionary layer of the brain. The reptilian brain is made up of the brain stem and cerebellum, which not only control the body’s vital functions, such as breathing and heart rate, but also instinctual actions and decisions.

Grab the attention of a customer’s reptilian brain with your company’s website or advertising and you’ll have a much better chance of guiding them toward a sale. This strategy is known as neuromarketing.

For example, the reptilian brain easily understands contrast. Show customers why your business is better than your competitor’s and why what you have to say is important. To stand out, use phrases such as “We are the only …” and “We are the best.”

The reptilian brain is geared to respond to visuals, so images can be far more persuasive than words. Be creative in your communications. Use short, simple sentences and include images that demonstrate the value of your claims. Incorporate customer testimonials as proof and share quick demonstrations of your products that will grab a consumer’s attention.

Incorporating psychology into your sales pitch and advertising is not about trying to trick customers. It’s about understanding how people’s brains interpret information so you can make decisions and focus your messaging accordingly.

Using these strategies to understand people’s minds can help you be more confident in your dealings with prospective customers and ultimately help you land more jobs.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Psychology-Based Strategies Can Help You Close More Deals

MFM Building Products Hires New Sales Representation for Oklahoma

MFM Building Products, a manufacturer of a full envelope of waterproofing and weather barrier products for the building industry, announced that the firm has reached an agreement with Heartland Architectural Products to represent MFM in the state of Oklahoma.

Heartland Architectural Products was founded in 2010 and will serve one-step and two-step building products and roofing distributors, with support through architect and builder promotions, training and marketing support.

Representation from Heartland Architectural Products includes:

David Gary, partner, has more than 20 years of experience in building product sales. He has held numerous positions within the roofing and building products market. Gary resides in Mustang, Oklahoma, and is an avid soccer player.

Kevin Decker, partner, brings more than 36 years of experience in the construction industry as an architect and construction specifier. His extensive construction knowledge is a valuable asset in servicing customer needs. Decker graduated from the University of Oklahoma with a bachelor’s degree in Architecture. He resides in Wellston, Oklahoma.

For contact information, visit www.mfmbp.com.

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Cotney Construction Law Announces New Partners

Cotney Construction Law (CCL), a national law firm for construction, specialty trades, and OSHA law, announced that Daniel Auerbach, Virgil Tray Batcher, Hilary Morgan, and Anthony Tilton have been named partners of the firm.

“Each of these attorneys epitomizes the diverse talent our firm offers,” said Trent Cotney, CEO of CCL. “Not only have they demonstrated superb legal capabilities, but they have also shown that they are committed to both their clients and the construction industry as a whole.”

Daniel Auerbach’s practice areas encompass construction litigation and various transactional matters. Specifically, Dan focuses on contract review and drafting, contract negotiation, bond and lien law, building code violation defense, construction defense litigation, OSHA defense, bid protests, and contractor licensing defense. He currently serves as general counsel for the Space Coast Licensed Roofers Association and the Treasure Coast Roofing and Sheet Metal Association.

Virgil Tray Batcher joined Cotney Construction Law in 2012 and represents clients in all aspects of construction law including lien law, bond law, construction defect litigation, OSHA defense, and licensing. Prior to becoming a lawyer, Tray worked in the construction industry as an estimator for a multi-million dollar structural contracting company. He currently serves as general counsel for the Florida Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Contractors Association.

Hilary Morgan focuses her practice on all aspects of construction law, including lien law, surety bond law, litigation, arbitration, construction defects, contract review and drafting, delay claims, bid protests, design professional liability, corporate law, and administrative law. Hilary serves on Associated Builders and Contractors National Young Professional Committee and is currently general counsel for National Women in Roofing.

Anthony Tilton practices in all areas of construction law. He works primarily on matters relating to OSHA and licensing defense. This includes the management and development of safety and health strategies. Anthony is also a Certified Building Contractor and has been involved in the industry his whole life; he has done framing, floor installation, remodels, site supervision, and served as safety officer for various construction companies. Anthony is general counsel for the Tile Roofing Institute.

For more information, visit www.cotneycl.com.

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Source: roofingmagazine.com =>Cotney Construction Law Announces New Partners

Conductive Primer Designed for Electronic Testing of Conventional Roof Assemblies

Detec Systems has developed TruGround, a conductive primer which enables accurate electronic leak detection (ELD) testing on conventional roof membranes including black EPDM, TPO, PVC, modified bitumen, hot and cold fluid applied. According to the manufacturer, TruGround must be installed directly below the membrane per ASTM D7877. TruGround can be used for quality assurance testing on newly installed membranes and is chemically compatible with fully adhered, mechanically attached and torch-down membranes. Once applied, ELD testing can be performed for the life of the roof. Future breaches or seam voids can be quickly pinpointed, allowing repairs to be done immediately, preventing costly moisture damage from occurring.

For more information, visit www.detecsystems.com.

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New Facility Keeps Popular Brewery Hopping

Tree House Brewing opened its new 51,200-square-foot brewery in Charlton, Massachusetts in July of 2017. Photos: Sika Sarnafil

Standing in line for hours for one case of canned beer might seem foolish to some people, but to fans of Tree House Brewing — which was recently named one of the country’s Top 15 Craft Breweries by Forbes magazine — it is well worth it. Tree House Brewing began humbly enough in 2011 in a barn in Brimfield, Massachusetts. And yes, there was a tree house on the property.

Since then, the brewery has grown so much in popularity that it required a bigger facility.  So in July of 2017, Tree House opened a 51,200-square-foot brewery on 68 acres in Charlton, Massachusetts. On opening day, the new facility consistently had 1,000 customers waiting for hours to purchase Tree House’s ales, IPAs and stouts. Many of the patrons traveled from out of state and some arrived at 6 a.m., six hours before the doors opened.

It’s been said that the key to Tree House Brewing’s success is meticulous attention to details such as temperatures, additives and the water used in the brewing. It only made sense that the same attention to detail would be utilized when selecting a roofing system for the new facility.

Meeting the Bar

The roof that Tree House Brewing selected to cover its new brewery is Sika Roofing’s Sarnafil EnergySmart PVC membrane installed with the Sarnafil RhinoBond System. “We like Sarnafil because it is easy to use, easy to specify and an industry leader,” says Peter Webster, designer/project manager at Austin Design in Brattleboro, Vermont. “The light colored, reflective roof also offers energy savings, and our past experience with the Sarnafil roof shows it is a great product.”

The roof system for the new brewery features Sika Roofing’s Sarnafil EnergySmart PVC membrane, which was installed using the Sarnafil RhinoBond System. Photos: Sika Sarnafil

The fact that the Sarnafil system is easy to install was an important factor, considering the time crunch of the project. “This was a ‘hurry up’ project — we weren’t done with the design when the steel structure went up,” Webster explains.

The Sarnafil RhinoBond System uses advanced induction welding technology to bond the membrane directly to specially coated plates used to secure the insulation to the deck, all without penetrating the roofing membrane.

In addition, the Sarnafil RhinoBond System can be used in temperatures as low as zero degrees Fahrenheit (-18°C), making it an ideal application method for winter projects.

“Much of the installation was during the winter,” states Robert Luukko, president of Kidd-Luukko Corporation in Worcester, Massachusetts, the roofing contractor on the project.

Photos: Sika Sarnafil

“Not only did Kidd-Luukko have to deal with cold temperatures, but the site is on top of a hill so there were high winds,” says Frank Quigley, president and owner of F.D. Quigley & Associates of Wilbraham, Massachusetts, the construction manager on the job. And of course, since it was winter they needed to make the building watertight as quickly as possible.

“Fortunately, Kidd-Luukko was able to seal the building before we were hit by some big snowstorms in February,” Webster says.

Other challenges included installing a 42-foot by 8-foot skylight and working around gables where the low roof wrapped around the corners. “Kidd-Luukko employees were very professional, well managed and well organized,” Quigley states. “I’d be happy to use them again.”

“Can-Do” Attitude

“Bob Luukko and his team had a ‘can-do’ attitude that really helped move the project along,” Webster comments. In fact, Kidd-Luukko was able to complete the installation ahead of the allotted eight-month time frame, Luukko notes, adding that teamwork was key. “We had weekly meetings with a great group of guys involved with the project where we would discuss how we were going to come in on time and on budget with this installation,” he says. Sika Roofing representatives also played a role in meeting the deadline. “We had multiple visits from the Sika technician, which really kept the project moving forward,” Luukko remarks.

After a vapor barrier was applied on the metal deck, crews installed polyiso insulation, tapered insulation and a high-density cover board before the membrane was attached. Photos: Sika Sarnafil

Today, both the roof and the brewery are doing great. “We’ve had no problems with the roof at all,” Webster says. Luukko adds, “This project went so well that we are receiving a lot of interest in installing Sarnafil roofs on other projects.”

At the new facility, Tree House Brewing will be able to produce 40,000 barrels a year — compared to 12,000 barrels at their former facility in Monson, Massachusetts — and they plan to eventually expand the capacity to 180,000 barrels a year. That’s news that should make thirsty Tree House beer fans very, very happy.

TEAM

Architect: Austin Design, Brattleboro, Vermont, www.austindesign.biz
Construction Manager: F.D. Quigley & Associates, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, www.fdquig.com
Roofing Contractor: Kidd-Luukko Corporation, Worcester, Massachusetts, www.kidd-luukko.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil 60 Mil EnergySmart White PVC membrane, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sarnafil.sika.com
Insulation: Sarnatherm Poly-Iso Insulation and Sarnatherm Coated Glass Tapered Insulation, Sika Sarnafil
Roof Board: Sarnatherm High Density Poly-Iso roof board with coated glass facers, Sika Sarnafil
Attachment System: Sarnafil RhinoBond System, Sika Sarnafil

The post New Facility Keeps Popular Brewery Hopping appeared first on Roofing.

Source: roofingmagazine.com =>New Facility Keeps Popular Brewery Hopping

MRCA SHARP Members Only Live Seminar or Webinar: Addressing Fall Protection Challenges for Building Contractors

With continually increasing citations and fall incidents, it’s no surprise that fall protection is, and will continue to be, a hot topic for OSHA.  

With new fall protection regulations becoming effective in 2017, compliance officers are highly focused on this issue. 

Leveraging case studies from both prolific, successful fall protection programs, as well as ones with catastrophic consequences, this presentation highlights the need for engineered fall protection systems, proper use of fall protection equipment and maintaining a managed fall protection program. The presenter will share ways to focus internally on best practices and coordinated programs, while also leveraging the changing landscape to bring more value to contractors’ clients. 

Key Takeaways: 

  • Current facts and figures that illustrate the ongoing fall protection challenge 
  • Ways contractors can provide additional value to their clients and increase their scope of work by incorporating fall protection items into an existing roofing project. 
  • Methods to address and provide safe access and compliant walking-working surfaces 
  • Explanation of common fall protection equipment misuses 

Register online here 

Speaker bios: 

Thomas E. Kramer, P.E., C.S.P. – Principal, LJB Inc. 

Mr. Kramer is a managing principal with LJB who has more than 22 years of experience. He is an internationally recognized expert in applying engineering and safety practices to reduce risk for workers at heights. As a dually registered professional engineer and certified safety professional, he specializes in the assessment and design of fall protection systems. Mr. Kramer is the Vice Chair of the ANSI Z359 Committee and chairs two subcommittees that develop standards for the overall Fall Protection Code and horizontal lifelines (ANSI Z359.1 and .17). He also serves as the president of the International Society for Fall Protection. 

Gary W. Auman -with law firm Auman, Mahan & Furry 

With 40 years of experience, Gary is a noted authority and staunch management advocate in workers’ compensation and occupational safety and health law. He regularly writes on occupational safety and health law for a number of trade publications. In addition, he is a frequent speaker on occupational safety and health topics at seminars and conferences throughout the United States. Gary represents both small and large companies and is general counsel to several national and regional trade associations.  Gary defends employers against federal and state OSHA citations across the United States. 

General Outline: 

1`. Background

a. Fall protection basics 

b. Statistics 

2. Case studies  

a.Impressive programs/projects 

b.Examples of catastrophic failure/near miss 

c. Lessons learned 

3. Common concerns  

a. Safe access and walking-working surfaces 

b. Equipment misuse 

c. New fall protection regulation requirements 

4. Action items  

a. Ways contractors can leverage new fall protection regulations, trends, etc. 

b. Gap analysis – where are you now vs. where do you need to be? 

Live Presentation: Builders Exchange Dayton, Education Room, 2077 Embury Park Rd., Dayton, OH 45414, Tuesday, July 24, 2018, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM EDT  

Or by Webinar: Addressing Fall Protection Challenges for Building Contractors / Webinar-Seminar, Tuesday, July 24, 2018,  10:30 AM – 12:30 PM EDT 

Register online here 

 

The post MRCA SHARP Members Only Live Seminar or Webinar: Addressing Fall Protection Challenges for Building Contractors appeared first on RoofersCoffeeShop.com.

Source: rooferconfee =>MRCA SHARP Members Only Live Seminar or Webinar: Addressing Fall Protection Challenges for Building Contractors

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